1830 Peters – Lockrow House

Conducting an energy retrofit of our first home, a neglected 1852 Greek Revival, provided us with hands on experience and knowledge. We were looking for a new project and were alerted to a vacant historic 1830 farmhouse.  The front of the home faces south and a bike path that leads to our town center is located on the north side of the property. After walking through the dilapidated building we could see the hidden value of the structure. We envisioned it powered 100% by the sun.

We set three goals for the project, to maintain the historic character, make the renovation sustainable and green and provide an energy efficient building.

We started demolition only to find substantial insect, water damage and other structural issues that greatly increased the scope of work.  Our architect incorporated the newly found damage as well as other ideas from the Building Science Corporation book “Builders Guide to Cold Climates” by Lstiburek and ideas from the book “Prescriptions for a Healthy House” by Baker-Laporte, Elliott and Banta.

We built new partitions inside the existing exterior walls using offset studs, allowing us to increase the insulation, as well as provide a thermal break. The new wall cavities were filled with approximately 8” of closed cell foam.  After replacing the second story roof structure (inadequate for the expected snow loads) we filled the rafter spaces with closed cell spray foam, covered the decking with a recycled rubber roof underlayment, 4 inches of Styrofoam insulation, and finally a standing seam metal roof.

The design required us to preserve the existing room layout and south facing facade of the building. We renovated the facade by reinstalling wood siding, rebuilding the porches, existing double hung windows and wooden storms. In addition, we installed magnetic interior storm windows over the existing windows to increase their energy efficiency.

Care was taken in choosing systems and products for energy reduction as well as local sourcing to reduce our construction and operating carbon footprint.

Quick Facts

General

Location
4 Balsam Way
Clifton Park, NY12065
United States
Building Type single-family residence
Project Type Zero Energy Ready / Near Zero Energy
Basis of Performance Claim Verified,
Bedrooms 3
Conditioned Floor Area

Energy Summary

Energy Data Type Measured,
Renewable Energy System Type(s) Photovoltaics, Geothermal, Other,
Ratings

NYS Energy Star
LEED Platinum Certification 2011

Annual renewable energy generated 9 983

Envelope and Mechanicals

Subslab assembly

Sub slab: dirt crawl spaces with two inches of Styrofoam under a plastic liner conditioned mechanical space basement with Anvantech flooring over two inches of Styrofoam and Patton polyethylene sheets

Foundation wall assembly

Existing, R-40 (rater indicates R-15) 8“ of closed cell foam over plastic wall liner with offset steel studs and covered with paperless drywall
Addition, R-20 (rater indicates R-23) 8“ of sprayed closed cell foam over continuous plastic wall

Above grade wall assembly

Existing, R-56 (rater indicates-47) offset wall studs with 8“ sprayed closed cell foam
Addition, R-52 off set wall studs with 8” of closed cell foam

8” double offset stud wall new addition and all existing exterior walls to offset thermal bridging and increase depth of foam insulation
American Clay over existing plaster or new wall board throughout

Door Assembly

The new doors are made by Thermo-Tru and are Energy star rated with a U value of 0.26 and a SHGC of 0.17

Air Changes per hour, ACH50 2.54

Project Team:

Other Team Members:

Owners: Paul & Joanne Coons
Architect: Bart Trudeau, Trudeau Architects, PLLC
Engineer: Dan Hampson, PlumbExcel Engineering
Green Consultant: Karen Totino, Green Conscience

Ratings:

NYS Energy Star
LEED Platinum Certification 2011

Awards:

NAHB Certified Green Building Emerald award

Completion

Completion Date: Saturday, January 1, 2011

Scope

We set three goals for the project, to maintain the historic character, make the renovation sustainable and green and provide an energy efficient building.

Type of Construction Renovated,
Number of buildings 1
Floor area of each building 2 134
Bedrooms 3
Stories 2
Conditioned Building Volume
Conditioned Floor Area

Location and Climate Details

single-family residence

Address
4 Balsam Way
Clifton Park, NY12065
United States
Location Type Suburaban
Climate Region Zone 5
Köppen Climate Type Dfb
Lat. / Long. POINT (-73.790919 42.833447)
Elevation 285
Solar Insolation 3.97 kWh/m2/day
Annual CDD and Base Temp 1021 | 65 F
Annual HDD and Base Temp 6840 | 65 F

Site

Site Conditions:

preexisting structure(s),

Site Description:

Monthly Energy Data and Utilities

Energy Data Type: Verified,

Electric Utility: National Grid

Gas Utility:

Renewables and Energy Balance

Renewable Energy Sources:Renewable energy is generated on-site but not on the building (e.g. wind turbine in the parking lot),

Renewable Energy System Description & Details: Photovoltaic - (40) 210 watt Evergreen panels on (5) pole mounted racks, 7000 SMA Sunny Boy Inverter (Engineer specified a 7.4 kW system to run house and charge future electric car. The PV contractor suggested 40, 200 watt panels to equally balance arrays across 5 poles but substituted 210 W panels at the time of installation which resulted in a 8.4 kW system.) Climate Master Tranquility TT038 Ground Source Heat Pump (Energy Star Rated) (6894 Heating degree days per designer) Solar Hot Water - Velux Model CLI-U12SKOW/L218EL, SRCC Rated SEF 3.6, 80 gallon Solar Hot water system with electric timer, interconnected with GSHP well to prevent overheating.

Annual renewable energy generated 9 983
Annual Renewable Energy Generated Data Type Measured,
Power Rating
Renewable Energy System Type(s) Photovoltaics, Geothermal, Other,
Source of Annual Production Data metered production value

Walls and Roof

Subslab assembly

Sub slab: dirt crawl spaces with two inches of Styrofoam under a plastic liner conditioned mechanical space basement with Anvantech flooring over two inches of Styrofoam and Patton polyethylene sheets

Subslab R-value
Slab edge assembly
Slab edge R-value
Foundation wall assembly

Existing, R-40 (rater indicates R-15) 8“ of closed cell foam over plastic wall liner with offset steel studs and covered with paperless drywall
Addition, R-20 (rater indicates R-23) 8“ of sprayed closed cell foam over continuous plastic wall

Foundation wall R-value
Above grade wall assembly

Existing, R-56 (rater indicates-47) offset wall studs with 8“ sprayed closed cell foam
Addition, R-52 off set wall studs with 8” of closed cell foam

8” double offset stud wall new addition and all existing exterior walls to offset thermal bridging and increase depth of foam insulation
American Clay over existing plaster or new wall board throughout

Above grade wall R-value
Cathedral ceiling assembly

Existing, R-72 +/- three by four rafters joined with new 8” rafters, the resulting cavity filled with closed cell foam, and then four inches of Styrofoam over plywood and recycled rubber underlayment
Addition, R-86 (rater indicates R-120 for both) new 10” rafters, the resulting cavity filled with closed cell foam, and then four inches of Styrofoam over plywood and recycled rubber underlayment

Cathedral ceiling R-value

Windows and Doors

Window Assembly:

Marvin Integrity windows on the north, east and west sides of the building with Comfortex, Comfor-Track Plus cellular shades; on the south side Magnetic One Lite storm windows by Allied Windows interior of the rebuilt antique original windows and exterior wooden storm sashes. The Marvin casement windows have a U value of .29 and SHGC of.30.

Door Assembly:

The new doors are made by Thermo-Tru and are Energy star rated with a U value of 0.26 and a SHGC of 0.17

Average window U-factor 0.29
Door U-Factor 0.26
Door Area

Mechanical Systems

Space cooling - Manufacturer & Model Climate Master Tranquility TT038 Ground Source Heat Pump (Energy Star Rated) (6894 Heating degree days per designer),
Space heating - Manufacturer & Model Climate Master Tranquility TT038 Ground Source Heat Pump (Energy Star Rated) (6894 Heating degree days per designer),
Domestic hot water - Manufacturer & Model Solar Hot Water - Velux Model CLI-U12SKOW/L218EL, SRCC Rated SEF 3.6
Domestic hot water - capacity 80
Ventilation - Manufacturer & Model LifeBreath (200Max) Heat Recovery Ventilator (Energy Star Rated), Air King ESSEV 30 kitchen range hood(Energy Star Rated), Ultra-air Whole House Dehumidifier 100V(Energy Star Rated), (6) ceiling fans(Energy Star Rated),
Lighting Manufacturer and Model 19 Energy Star rated either CFL or LED light fixtures with the remaining 14 CFL equipped recessed fixtures,
Lighting Efficiency
Mechanical Equipment Installation Details and Comments

Envelope

Air Changes per hour, ACH50 2.54
Air Changes per hour, CFM50 1 110.00

General Process

We started demolition only to find substantial insect, water damage and other structural issues that greatly increased the scope of work. Our architect incorporated the newly found damage as well as other ideas from the Building Science Corporation book “Builders Guide to Cold Climates” by Lstiburek and ideas from the book “Prescriptions for a Healthy House” by Baker-Laporte, Elliott and Banta.

The design required us to preserve the existing room layout and south facing facade of the building. We renovated the facade by reinstalling wood siding, rebuilding the porches, existing double hung windows and wooden storms. In addition, we installed magnetic interior storm windows over the existing windows to increase their energy efficiency.

Design for Adaptability:

Software Tools

Software Tools:

General modeling information:

Lessons Learned

Outcome of Project Goals:

The project met our three goals! We received the 2011 Town of Clifton Park Historic Preservation award and Town Conservation Easement, earned LEED Platinum and NAHB Certified Green Building Emerald awards and a NYS Energy Star rating. For the first year the local utility paid us for our excess electricity. We are now using the excess carbon free energy generated to power a 2012 Nissan Leaf and a 2012 Toyota plug-in Prius to help cover our transportation carbon footprint.

Discrepancies:

Rebates and Financial Incentives

Federal incentives
Local incentives
State incentives
Utility incentives
Other incentives
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