Transformations—15 Laurel Street, Northampton, MA

15 Laurel Street, Northampton is the first Transformations, Inc. home to be completed under the Massachusetts Department of Energy Pathway to Zero grant program.  This HERS -9 home was completed on June 17, 2015.

Quick Facts

General

Location
15 Laurel Street
Northampton, MA01060
United States
Building Type Singe family residence
Project Type Zero Energy
Basis of Performance Claim Modeled,
Bedrooms 4
Conditioned Floor Area 2 234

Energy Summary

Energy Data Type
Renewable Energy System Type(s)
Ratings
Annual renewable energy generated

Envelope and Mechanicals

Subslab assembly

2" of rigid under the basement slab.

Foundation wall assembly

3.5" of high density foam.

Above grade wall assembly

12" of double studded wall mostly filled with medium density foam.

Door Assembly
Air Changes per hour, ACH50 1.00

Project Team:

Other Team Members:

Transformations, Inc. was the Builder and the Solar Installer.

Ratings:

Awards:

Completion

Completion Date: Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Scope

The project consisted of the design and construction of a new single family home built on speculation.

Type of Construction New,
Number of buildings
Floor area of each building
Bedrooms 4
Stories 2
Conditioned Building Volume 23 105
Conditioned Floor Area 2 234

Location and Climate Details

Singe family residence

Address
15 Laurel Street
Northampton, MA01060
United States
Location Type Urban
Climate Region Zone 5
Köppen Climate Type Dfb
Lat. / Long. POINT (-72.6483401 42.3087649)
Elevation 183
Solar Insolation
Annual CDD and Base Temp |
Annual HDD and Base Temp |

Site

Site Conditions:

previously developed land,

Site Description:

The site was previously part of the hospital property in Northampton, MA.

Monthly Energy Data and Utilities

Energy Data Type: Modeled,

Electric Utility:

Gas Utility:

Renewables and Energy Balance

Renewable Energy Sources:

Renewable Energy System Description & Details:

Annual renewable energy generated
Annual Renewable Energy Generated Data Type
Power Rating
Renewable Energy System Type(s)
Source of Annual Production Data

Walls and Roof

Super-insulation of the building with 12" think walls.

Subslab assembly

2" of rigid under the basement slab.

Subslab R-value 10.00
Slab edge assembly

2" of rigid.

Slab edge R-value 10.00
Foundation wall assembly

3.5" of high density foam.

Foundation wall R-value 22.20
Above grade wall assembly

12" of double studded wall mostly filled with medium density foam.

Above grade wall R-value 49.00
Cathedral ceiling assembly
Cathedral ceiling R-value

Windows and Doors

Window Assembly:

Door Assembly:

Average window U-factor 0.21
Door U-Factor
Door Area

Mechanical Systems

Space cooling - Manufacturer & Model Mitsubishi MSZ-FE12NA & FE9NA heads and MUZ-FE12NA & FE9NA condensers,
Space heating - Manufacturer & Model Mitsubishi MSZ-FE12NA & FE9NA heads and MUZ-FE12NA & FE9NA condensers,
Domestic hot water - Manufacturer & Model AO Smith heat pump hot water heater
Domestic hot water - capacity 50
Ventilation - Manufacturer & Model Panasonic Whisper Green bathroom ventilation fan, 30-70 CFM,
Lighting Manufacturer and Model
Lighting Efficiency
Mechanical Equipment Installation Details and Comments

Envelope

Air Changes per hour, ACH50 1.00
Air Changes per hour, CFM50 385.00

General Process

The Farmhouse design have evolved over time. We first used the Farmhouse style in 2008 in the Coppersmith Way development in Townsend, MA. Building Science Corporation, our subcontractors and a review by MassDevelopment helped evolve the designs in 2011. The hall bathroom on the second floor was brought into the main box. This allowed for the bonus room over the garage. The changes for Laurel Street included stepping back the garage 10 feet to meet the Northampton Design Guidelines and changing from propane hot water to an air source heat pump for the hot water.

The energy performance objective for this site was to provide all of the home’s energy needs using renewable energy. Both of the homes had the opportunity for projected overproduction that will either be used for electrical vehicles or exported to the grid. We also had a goal of having the homes be fossil fuel free. The air source heat pump water allowed us to meet that goal.

The overall site was ideal---wide open and sunny. Since the southern exposure was to the right side as you faced the building area, we needed to use a home design with the large roof area facing toward the side. To accomplish this, we used the Farmhouse design. It had the gable end to the street, the garage to the north and the open living area and large roof area facing south. This enabled us to install 33 solar electric panels on each of the home’s roofs---more than enough energy to supply the efficient home’s needs.

Design for Adaptability:

Software Tools

Software Tools:

General modeling information:

REM/Rate - Residential Energy Analysis and Rating Software, v14.6.1

Lessons Learned

Outcome of Project Goals:

Discrepancies:

Rebates and Financial Incentives

Federal incentives

A 30% Federal tax credit on the solar system went to the buyers of the home.

Local incentives
State incentives

A $1,000 state tax incentive for solar systems is available to the buyer. The Solar Renewable Energy Credits (S-RECs) went to the buyer.

Utility incentives

The Tier 3 utility incentive of $7,000 was retained by the builder.

Other incentives
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